I built a desk organizer to replace some styrofoam blocks that the computer was propped up on. It’s built out of oak and finished with Danish oil. The drawers are held together with box joints. There’s even a hawkeye inlay on the left. I have to give credit to Brajesh for the design.

Here’s how to make a fancy rolling pin.  Cut a curf at a steep angle in maple. Fill the curf with a thin slat of walnut and glue. After the glue sets, rotate the maple and repeat on all 4 sides.  Flip the maple end for end and repeat 4 more times. The glue-up alone takes a few days. The celtic knot appears like magic after you start the turning.  I batched out several of these and dole them out as gifts.

Here’s the process for making my famous Sinister cutting board. I’m thinking of selling these on etsy. 

How to make a segmented bowl. 

1) Glue up long strips of scrap wood.

2) Cut them into short equal segments with 15-degree miters (a table saw jig makes this easier and safer).

3) Glue them into rings (hose clamps work well).

4) Glue the rings into stacks. At the base of the ring stack, glue a solid piece for the bottom of the bowl and a sacrificial piece of wood that you can screw to your lathe.

5) Mount to lathe and turn it smooth.

6) Sand and finish. Voila - you have a bowl.

Dunnwald’s Bench installed.  It was a fun project and they may have the fanciest recycling storage on the block now.  I added a ‘before’ picture for comparison.

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #5.  The bench is all done and I started applying the finish.  The top will get 7 coats of Arm-R-Seal. 

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #5.  The bench is all done and I started applying the finish.  The top will get 7 coats of Arm-R-Seal. 

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #4.  This weekend I finished milling the slab of cherry and inlayed the bowties. I attached the doors. I tweeked the hinges so it shuts tighter. A lot of fiddling about. But now it’s basically built except for some minor details, the final sanding, and applying the finish. I should be able to do the sanding and start the finishing next weekend.

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #3.  Not a lot of progress this weekend since I had family in town. I did manage to get the hinges installed and some sanding done. This is an underside view. By moving the hinges back 4” from the edge, I was able to keep the bench shorter because the bins will ‘drop away’ instead of ‘tilting up’. It’s hard to explain in words, but it was a bit of engineering that should work well and takes advantage of the legs.

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #3.  Not a lot of progress this weekend since I had family in town. I did manage to get the hinges installed and some sanding done. This is an underside view. By moving the hinges back 4” from the edge, I was able to keep the bench shorter because the bins will ‘drop away’ instead of ‘tilting up’. It’s hard to explain in words, but it was a bit of engineering that should work well and takes advantage of the legs.

Dunnwald’s Bench: Weekend #2.  The doors are glued together.  The legs and face trim are glued to the carcass. The interior housing for the plastic bins is assembled. Next weekend will be a lot of sanding.  I’m making good progress.

Dunnwald’s Bench. I started a bench that has storage space for recycling. I cut down the plywood, cut the dadoes and grooves, and assembled the carcass.  I also started milling the rails and stiles of the doors.  Everything will be put together with mortise and tenons. This project will be fun and has some interesting design challenges.